Roman and Williams to Honor the National Civic Art Society on March 10 in NYC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 2, 2016
CONTACT: [email protected] or (202) 670-1776
The Fitzroy condo building. Designed by Roman and Williams.
The Fitzroy condo building. Designed by Roman and Williams.
The National Civic Art Society is delighted to announce that on March 10 in New York City, the developers of the new Fitzroy condo building in Chelsea are hosting a party at which the Society will be honored. Roman and Williams – the designers of the Deco-inspired terracotta building, which will be located next to the High Line – chose to make NCAS the recipient of that honor. (You can find a Curbed story on the building, whose slogan is “Bring beauty back,” here.)

Roman and Williams released the following statement:

In celebration of the new Fitzroy Residences, JDS Development Group and Largo Investments have organized an event to honor the design firm Roman and Williams. In the same spirit of civic pride that motivated the creation of the building, the firm suggested a gift to the National Civic Art Society to mark the occasion.

For Stephen Alesch and Robin Standefer – the principals of Roman and Williams – the National Civic Art Society represents an organized entity that has chosen to stand up against the status quo approach to design in the public realm, fighting the battle to liberate us from the restricting myth that the modernist style is the only acceptable “architectural language of our time,” when many people – including Roman and Williams – express their values and now-ness using a traditional, vernacular and adaptive visual language.

According to NCAS president Justin Shubow, “The National Civic Art Society is proud to be recognized by the distinguished firm of Roman and Williams. Their widely acclaimed work demonstrates that traditional, beautiful architecture is alive and well – and highly desirable. They are rebels in defense of tradition who reconcile past and present in exciting and innovative ways.”

 

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